Call For Abstracts

Now Open


Langscape Magazine Volume 7, Issue 2,  Winter (Northern Hemisphere) 2018
Theme: "Nourishing Body and Soul: The Biocultural Diversity of Food"
    
Deadline for Abstracts: July 27, 2018


Food is a central part of all human cultures. And that’s not just in terms of how food is acquired or produced—whether it is grown, gathered, hunted, or fished—but also, and importantly, in terms of how it is prepared and shared and of the rituals and symbolisms that become associated with it. Food is a vital thread that runs all through our lives and one of the strongest links between our past and our present, both as individuals and as members of cultural groups. The diversity of foods has arguably been one of the defining aspects of human biocultural diversity.

Most of what we recognize today as culturally distinctive cuisines and foodways, however, is based on a mixture of indigenous foods and those that originated somewhere else—sometimes thousands of kilometers away. Trade in (or, all too often, appropriation of) food items dates back many centuries. In this sense, the “globalization” of food has been going on for a long time.

Today, the contemporary form of globalization has hastened the spread of corporate-controlled food systems: industrial agriculture, industry-managed supply and distribution of foodstuffs, and enticements to consume a relatively narrow range of profit-making food products. This trend threatens to upend the diverse foodways that have contributed so much to the world’s diverse biocultural identity. In fact, the corporatization of food has emerged as a direct threat to Indigenous Peoples and local communities—to their health, their collective identity, and their cultural and spiritual well being.

In the next issue of Langscape Magazine, for which I am serving as guest editor, we will explore the biocultural diversity of food as physical, cultural, and spiritual nourishment. The possible topics are nearly endless, so intricately is food interwoven through human life. We welcome proposals on any aspect of the biocultural diversity of food, with a focus on how biologically diverse foods have contributed to cultural distinctiveness—and vice versa.

Here are some example of possible topics:

  • Descriptions of the general significance of food to a particular culture, both historically and today (including current threats to traditional foodways and bioculturally informed responses)
  • Community-based experiences with maintaining or recovering traditional ways of acquiring/producing food
  • Biocultural approaches to preservation of food genetic diversity: seed saving/sharing, wild relatives of crops, heritage cultivars and breeds, etc.
  • Maintenance of traditional food preparation techniques and sharing patterns/rituals
  • Promotion of traditional diets as a response to community health problems (e.g., diabetes, obesity)


How does this work? Anyone interested in contributing to this theme (including Indigenous youth) should send us an abstract for consideration—the idea for your proposed contribution (see detailed instructions below). From those proposals, we select those for which we wish to invite full submissions. While we may not be able to accept every proposal, we will carefully consider and personally respond to each one.

You can propose:

  • Thought pieces for our “Ideas” section
  • Personal accounts, dialogues, stories, or poetry for “Reflections”
  • Reports from the field for “Dispatches”
  • Discussions of policy interventions or practical solutions for “Action”

Contributions to Langscape Magazine may take different forms, either text-driven (essays, poetry, etc.) or artwork-driven (such as photo essays, video essays, or other visual art).

If you’d like to be considered as a possible contributor to this food-focused issue, send us an abstract soon! Please carefully follow our instructions below on how to submit. The deadline is July 27, 2018.

With warm regards,

Dave Harmon
Guest Editor, Langscape Magazine

Unity in Biocultural Diversity - Together We Can!

Langscape Magazine is an extension of the voice of Terralingua. It supports our mission by educating minds and hearts about the importance and value of biocultural diversity. We aim to illustrate biocultural diversity through scientific and traditional knowledge, within an appealing sensory context of articles, stories and art.

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT:

SUBMIT NO LATER THAN JULY 27, 2018, using the submission form accessed through the "Submit Here" link below. 

To help us evaluate all submissions on an equal basis, it is important that abstracts be received in a common format. Please submit your abstract by sending us a text document (Microsoft Word or similar; PDF not accepted) with the following information in the order below:

  1. Suggested Title of Your Proposed Submission (maximum 20 words)
  2. Name(s) of Author(s)
  3. Very short (maximum 50 words) biographical note for each author, written in the third person (for Indigenous submitters, please include your tribal affiliation; for Indigenous youth, please also include your age)
  4. Name of Corresponding Author (the person who will be responsible for all correspondence with us and who will then pass on information to co-authors, if any; note: the Corresponding Author need not be the main author of the submission)
  5. Email of Corresponding Author
  6. Mailing Address of Corresponding Author
  7. Format of Submission (whether an article, photo/video essay, or poem)
  8. Abstract (maximum 300 words) (the abstract should briefly describe your topic and explain why you think that Langscape readers will find it interesting)
  9. The section of Langscape you believe your submission best fits: Ideas, Reflections, Dispatches, or Action (select one)

After reviewing all abstracts received, we will let you know by August 6 whether we would like to invite you to submit a full contribution.

PLEASE NOTE:  An invitation to submit a full contribution does not mean that your contribution is already accepted for publication. It means that we are interested in your idea and would like to see your full submission.

IMPORTANT: Be aware that Langscape Magazine does not publish formal scientific or technical papers. We seek contributions that, while based on solid scholarship, express concepts in accessible language and in a literary rather than an academic style. Tell a story with words and/or images!


BEFORE YOU SUBMIT, you may want to look at the most recent issue released in June 2018, Vol. 7-1. Read the EditorialTable of Contents, and the sample articles. (Copies of the full issue are available through our Market, or you may purchase a subscription.) 

If you are still unsure whether your contribution would fit with Terralingua’s perspectives and the approach of Langscape Magazine, we suggest that you review the following Resources:

 


  • Descriptions of the general significance of food to a particular culture, both historically and today (including current threats to traditional foodways and bioculturally informed responses)
  • Community-based experiences with maintaining or recovering traditional ways of acquiring/producing food
  • Biocultural approaches to preservation of food genetic diversity: seed saving/sharing, wild relatives of crops, heritage cultivars and breeds, etc.
  • Maintenance of traditional food preparation techniques and sharing patterns/rituals
  • Promotion of traditional diets as a response to community health problems (e.g., diabetes, obesity)
  • Descriptions of the general significance of food to a particular culture, both historically and today (including current threats to traditional foodways and bioculturally informed responses)
  • Community-based experiences with maintaining or recovering traditional ways of acquiring/producing food
  • Biocultural approaches to preservation of food genetic diversity: seed saving/sharing, wild relatives of crops, heritage cultivars and breeds, etc.
  • Maintenance of traditional food preparation techniques and sharing patterns/rituals
  • Promotion of traditional diets as a response to community health problems (e.g., diabetes, obesity)
  • Descriptions of the general significance of food to a particular culture, both historically and today (including current threats to traditional foodways and bioculturally informed responses)
  • Community-based experiences with maintaining or recovering traditional ways of acquiring/producing food
  • Biocultural approaches to preservation of food genetic diversity: seed saving/sharing, wild relatives of crops, heritage cultivars and breeds, etc.
  • Maintenance of traditional food preparation techniques and sharing patterns/rituals
  • Promotion of traditional diets as a response to community health problems (e.g., diabetes, obesity)
  • Descriptions of the general significance of food to a particular culture, both historically and today (including current threats to traditional foodways and bioculturally informed responses)
  • Community-based experiences with maintaining or recovering traditional ways of acquiring/producing food
  • Biocultural approaches to preservation of food genetic diversity: seed saving/sharing, wild relatives of crops, heritage cultivars and breeds, etc.
  • Maintenance of traditional food preparation techniques and sharing patterns/rituals
  • Promotion of traditional diets as a response to community health problems (e.g., diabetes, obesity)
    • Thought pieces for our "Ideas" section
    • Personal accounts, dialogues, stories, or poetry for "Reflections"
    • Reports from the field for "Dispatches"
    • Discussions of policy interventions or practical solutions for "Action"
    In your abstract, please try to address the following questions:
    • Thought pieces for our "Ideas" section
    • Personal accounts, dialogues, stories, or poetry for "Reflections"
    • Reports from the field for "Dispatches"
    • Discussions of policy interventions or practical solutions for "Action"
    In your abstract, please try to address the following questions: